Barbara J. King

Friday Animal Blog

The Elephant Who Tweets

May 28, 2010

The Elephant Who Tweets

In March 2010, an Asian elephant calf was born at Taronga Zoo near Sydney, Australia, under highly unusual conditions. A pregnant female had, about a week prior, gone into on-again, off-again labor. Medical scanning of this elephant indicated that her baby was lodged in a fetal position so poor that birth (more…)

One Personís Positive Impact

May 21, 2010

One Personís Positive Impact

As of the summer of 2002, the West African nation of Gabon had no system of national parks. What it did have was an abundance of wildlife-- free-ranging forest buffalo, leopards, red river hogs, mandrills, chimpanzees, gorillas, elephants, and hippos; serpents like the famed Gaboon viper; and in the realm (more…)

Monkey Stress

May 14, 2010

May 14, 2010
Monkey Stress
A newly published study on African monkeys forges a surprising link among males, infants, and stress. An in-press, just-now-online paper from the journal Animal Behaviour by German scientist Dr. Stefanie Henkel and her colleagues makes a convincing case that male monkeys choose to carry infants as a way to cement good (more…)

Quiet

May 7, 2010

This past weekend, my husband and I walked together on the grounds of the Yorktown Battlefield here in southeastern Virginia, across the York River from our home. The dayís temperature exceeded 80 degrees, and when we crossed from the sun into shaded woods, the cooling felt wonderful on our skin. In that (more…)

Selected Works

Nonfiction
Why are animals so irresistible to us? Why do we live with and care so deeply about them? From the famous "art caves" of ice-age Europe, to the ancient villages where animals were first domesticated, to stories of apes, whales, dogs, and cats doing fascinating things today, King weaves together a scenario about the animal-human bond that encompasses our past, present and future.
Can scientists discover a prehistory of religion just as they have traced the evolution of technology, language, and art? What does compassion in chimpanzees, or burial patterns in our human ancestors and Neanderthals, tell us about the origins of religion? In Evolving God, named a Top Ten Religion Book for 2007 by the American Library Association, Barbara King explores these questions.
How do chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas-- the African apes -- communicate using body postures and gestures? Using her many years of experience studying these apes, Barbara King answers this question in a book that offers a new perspective on the evolution of language.